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Time Travelling in VMware Server for Linux (Guest & Host) 6 August 2008

Posted by Maulvi Bakar in : Home,Linux,Work , 2 comments

I run two VMware host machines at home. This is where I do most of my ‘Training’. Well, most of my knowledge on Linux are self-learned anyway. This is where I do my R&D.

Simply, theory is good. But how do you know whether the theory is practical? What potential pitfalls when you deploy a solution? Especially Free (Libre) and Open Source Solutions? Not to say FLOSS solutions are no good, but in a commercial environment, when paying customers are willing to pay good money to transfer their operational risks to you, you better be sure of the solution that you’re proposing.

FLOSS solutions backed by commercial vendors – eg. Red Hat, is a safe bet. You can propose it to customers and as a fall back, there’s always Red Hat. Problem starts with FLOSS solutions that specifically states – ‘No warranty/guarantee of any kind’ 😛

Not to say they’re no good, mind you. That’s where you as a FLOSS Service Provider comes in. To provide the kind of warranty/guarantee that the customer wants for such FLOSS solutions. The other advantage of FLOSS, if the customer’s not happy with a FLOSS vendor, being FLOSS, you can always go to another vendor. That forces FLOSS vendors to always provide the best service.

Anyway, I’m rambling and digressing –

My guest OSes keep travelling faster than my host OS, sometimes as fast as 2 seconds every 10 seconds. Need to tune the VMware server host a bit –

file – /etc/vmware/config

host.cpukHz = 3400000
hostinfo.noTSC = TRUE
tools.syncTime = TRUE

The first line is to specify the maximum CPU clock rate the system may run.
Second line is to specify that the cpu is not running at a constant clock rate (speedstep, cpufreq or power management is active when idle) and the timestamp counter is inaccurate an to use it as the least.
The last line sets the default to use vmware-tools timesync function.

Well, I hope this is a permanent solution.

Enjoy

π